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Master of Science Athletic Training

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MSAT Curriculum & Course Descriptions

The Master of Science in Athletic Training program requires 65 credit hours. It can be completed in two years (six semesters), including summers.

Year 1 – Summer 2017 (9 credit hours)

Course covering the roles and responsibilities of an athletic trainer as well as the history, governance structure and regulation of the athletic training profession.  This course will also cover introductory concepts related to evidence-based practice, basic evaluation skills, and documentation. Instruction and practical application of taping, wrapping, bracing techniques and protective equipment is also included.

This course is designed to cover in-depth Basic Life Support Skills. Topics addressing prevention, recognition, and management of life-threatening and/or severe injury/illness are included. Application of skills that include the environment, CPR/AED, airway management, immobilization, bleeding control and sudden illness management are also addressed. Students will be certified in Basic Life Support. 

This course is an introduction to the structural anatomical study of the human body for athletic training students focusing on the interrelationships of structure, function and human movement. Special emphasis will be given to those systems with direct and major roles in exercise performance, namely the muscular, skeletal, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The structure and related function of each of these body systems will be examined in detail, emphasizing the key components related to exercise and training. The major anatomical structure of other body systems (e.g., gastrointestinal) will also be covered. Gross anatomical identification of specific bones, landmarks, origins/insertions/actions, joint structures, nerves, vessels and organs will be the primary focus of this class.


Year I – Fall 2017 (15 credit hours)

Course covering an in-depth study of the normal anatomical structures in the lower extremity and lumbar spine including joint structure and musculoskeletal/nervous systems. Also discussed are common risk factors and causes of injuries as identified by contemporary epidemiological studies, common injuries to each body part, typical symptoms and common clinical signs associated with injuries/illnesses with the physically active. A lab covering the assessment techniques for injuries commonly seen in the lower quarter will be included. 

This course is designed to provide the student with the foundational theory and principles related to injury/illness intervention. Included are topics addressing tissue healing, theories of pain and pain control, concepts of kinetic chain stability and mobility, as well as principles related to the use of therapeutic medications.

Course covering the origin, insertion and action of muscles and muscle groups of the body with attention the methods to evaluate muscle length, joint range of motion, and to measure strength using manual muscle or break tests. Basic theoretical principles of movement science including motor control, motor learning, motor development and general principles of biomechanics for movement analysis will be discussed. Application of these principles to the study of human motion, postural evaluation, gait analysis and evaluation of muscle function during activities common to sport participation and rehabilitation are also addressed.

Introduction to research methodology and qualitative and quantitative data analysis as related to evidence-based practice of athletic training. The course addresses formulating clinical questions; searching, reading and appraising research; understanding levels of evidence; and citing and referencing works to become consumers of and designers of evidence. The course also introduces students to the selection, application and interpretation of basic descriptive, correlational and interferential statistics.

Course designed to refine psychomotor skills and introduce specific athletic training proficiencies integrating cognitive concepts and skills into progressively higher-level practical application. Skill integration will be achieved through successful completion and evaluation of new and existing skills/clinical proficiencies under the direct supervision of an athletic training preceptor. 

Fieldwork experiences designed to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skill through live or scenario-based application. Students are expected to demonstrate clinical reasoning skills, professional verbal and written communication, evidence-based practice and ethical conduct. Students will gain clinical experiences either on or off campus under the direct supervision or an athletic training preceptor.


Year 1 – Winter 2018 (14.5 credit hours)

Course covering an in-depth study of the normal anatomical structures in the upper extremities, head, cervical spine and thoracic spine, including joint structure and musculoskeletal/nervous systems. Also discussed are common risk factors and causes of injuries as identified by contemporary epidemiological studies, common injuries to each body part, typical symptoms and common clinical signs associated with injuries/illnesses with the physically active. A lab covering the assessment techniques commonly seen will be included.

This course focuses on the in-depth study of therapeutic exercises used in athletic training. Instruction will include rehabilitation plan development, implementation, documentation and evaluation of efficacy of the rehabilitation program. Specific and current rehabilitation techniques will be introduced to the student for specific athletic injuries.

This course is designed to provide the student with the basic understanding of pathophysiology as a change from normal physiological functioning of the various systems of the human body. The course is based on illness and disease within a systems framework across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on an overview of the etiology, pathogenesis and clinical features of common illnesses and disease most often encountered by allied health care professionals. The course will also introduce the student to therapeutic medications commonly prescribed for injury and illnesses associated with the physically active population, both prescription and over-the-counter. Included in the course will be indications, contraindications, precautions, record-keeping procedures, drug classifications, side effects and governing regulations related to the use of medication with the physically active.

Course designed to refine psychomotor skills and introduce specific athletic training proficiencies integrating cognitive concepts and skills into progressively higher-level practical application. Skill integration will be achieved through successful completion and evaluation of new and existing skills/clinical proficiencies under the direct supervision of an athletic training preceptor.

Fieldwork experiences designed to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skill through live or scenario-based application. Students are expected to demonstrate clinical reasoning skills, professional verbal and written communication, evidence-based practice and ethical conduct. Students will gain clinical experiences either on or off campus under the direct supervision or an athletic training preceptor.

Applied research relevant to athletic training through locating, appraising and critiquing current evidence. Students will write a thorough literature review related to a research question. 


Year 2 – Summer 2018 (6.5 credit hours)

Fieldwork experiences designed to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skill through live or scenario-based application. Students are expected to demonstrate clinical reasoning skills, professional verbal and written communication, evidence-based practice and ethical conduct. Students will gain clinical experiences either on or off campus under the direct supervision or an athletic training preceptor.

Applied research relevant to athletic training through implementing a research protocol to collect and analyze data.

This course provides students with the basic program design concepts and rationale to design fitness programs for individuals emphasizing cardiovascular training, strength training, flexibility training, balance, power and speed/agility. Students will learn how to design exercise programs based on underlying principles of individualized fitness assessment and body composition results, personal health/fitness goals, weight management and exercise design principles. The course is also designed to provide the students with a basic understanding of nutritional concepts.


Year 2 – Fall 2018 (10.5 credit hours)

Course covering the physiological effects, indications, contraindications, and precautions of contemporary therapeutic modality use. Students will design and plan therapeutic interventions. The focus will be on the application of therapeutic modalities according to evidence-based protocols. Included in this course will be the role of equipment safety and maintenance of therapeutic modalities. 

This lecture/seminar course will focus on the professional management and administrative issues in athletic training. This course will introduce the student to the advanced theory and techniques associated with the management of the more complex issues associated with athletic training. Organization and administration topics will include management and supervision of personnel, financial resources, as well as the preparation in planning, designing, developing, organizing, implementing, directing, and evaluating an athletic training health care program and facility. Current issues in athletic training related to professional conduct and practice will also be discussed. Legal concerns, risk management and insurance will also be discussed. 

This course examines current issues and trends in athletic training at the local, state, district and national levels. Students will examine current documents and evidence related to athletic training practice. Students will be exposed to health care professionals who will describe the relationship of current trends in athletic training to their areas of practice.

Course designed to refine psychomotor skills and introduce specific athletic training proficiencies integrating cognitive concepts and skills into progressively higher-level practical application. Skill integration will be achieved through successful completion and evaluation of new and existing skills/clinical proficiencies under the direct supervision of an athletic training preceptor.

Fieldwork experiences designed to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skill through live or scenario-based application. Students are expected to demonstrate clinical reasoning skills, professional verbal and written communication, evidence-based practice and ethical conduct. Students will gain clinical experiences either on or off campus under the direct supervision or an athletic training preceptor.

Applied research relevant to athletic training through collecting and analyzing data; and drafting a research manuscript or research portfolio. 


Year 2 – Winter 2019 (9.5 credit hours)

This course is designed to describe communication strategies, techniques and psychosocial interventions commonly used in athletic training. Included in this course is the recognition and management strategies of mental health conditions, as well as the role or personality in motivation in response to events and return to activity. The focus will be on the application of communication strategies, and development of management and referral strategies. The course will also address cultural competence in patient care and the role of various mental healthcare providers that comprise the mental health referral network.

This seminar-based course is designed to prepare students to embark on paths of personal leadership development. The course will examine leadership theory and research and emphasize the development of leadership and interpersonal skills. Understanding various methods of bringing about change will be provided and researched by learners, and then discussed in our time together. Students in this course will apply foundational business concepts in athletic training through self-assessment case studies and professional experiential exercises.

This course is a culminating experience in athletic training that will provide the student with a comprehensive review of athletic training foundational and specific knowledge regarding the domains of athletic training. This course will help the student to prepare for athletic training practice.

Course designed to refine psychomotor skills and introduce specific athletic training proficiencies integrating cognitive concepts and skills into progressively higher-level practical application. Skill integration will be achieved through successful completion and evaluation of new and existing skills/clinical proficiencies under the direct supervision of an athletic training preceptor.

Fieldwork experiences designed to integrate previously acquired knowledge and skill through live or scenario-based application. Students are expected to demonstrate clinical reasoning skills, professional verbal and written communication, evidence-based practice and ethical conduct. Students will gain clinical experiences either on or off campus under the direct supervision or an athletic training preceptor.

Applied research relevant to athletic training through completing a research manuscript or research portfolio, and developing an abstract and presentation for professional dissemination.