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College of Health Sciences Graduate Health Sciences Programs

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Doctor of Health Science Curriculum 

Year One* 

Semester One

The process involved in andragogy, the teaching or information sharing for adults, is considerably different than the processes involved in pedagogy, the teaching or information sharing for children. The reasons for learning, the concepts and principles of adult learning, and the processes for adult learning have a significant impact on effective leadership.
This course assists graduate students in developing strong, effective leadership skills. Successful professionals require effective leadership skills to flourish in the rapidly changing environment in which services are delivered today. This dynamic course will focus on developing the internal attitudes and external skills needed to lead oneself, other individuals, and teams.

Semester Two

This course addresses multiple determinants of health including social, cultural, economic, and physical environments as well as personal behaviors and characteristics. Students will be introduced to models and theories of health behavior change at intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy levels and will apply theories to create protocols for health behavior change.
This course addresses concepts of teaching, learning theories, and learning styles in designing, implementing, and evaluating learning experiences used to educate students, colleagues, and the community. Students will develop and utilize creative instructional methodologies that actively engage learners in online and traditional classroom settings.
This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of interprofessionalism in education and practice. Students will gain an appreciation of working collaboratively with people from multiple professions to optimize health for individuals and populations. Core competencies in interprofessional collaborative practice will be explored as students learn with, from, and about each other to improve collaboration and the quality of healthcare.

Summer

This course will provide students with a practical introduction to the development and evaluation of an educational curriculum. Content related to curricular development for purposes of community health education, staff education, and student education will be examined and applied. Factors, influences, and trends in higher education with respect to health sciences will also be explored.
This course provides students an array of skills and competencies needed to work effectively in health care or higher education settings and organizations that are committed to evidence-based decision making. Focus is placed on the steps of evidence-based practice including investigating complex social or clinical issues, searching and appraising the evidence for potential solutions/innovations, planning and implementing changes, evaluating the outcomes, and identifying gaps in knowledge. Students will learn to interpret evidence provided through research studies, including qualitative and quantitative paradigms.

Year Two*

Semester One

This course is unique because it provides a platform for research application within the healthcare context. Faculty and students learn to work collaboratively across areas of clinical interest. Students interactively explore research areas of interest and analyze data. This design emphasizes student understanding and application of research that forwards the scientific progression of evidence-based clinical practice and scholarship.
Principles of evidence-based measurement with an emphasis on standardized assessment tools across healthcare professions will be explored in this course. Application of classification schemes for the integration for frameworks into the assesment process will be discussed. Evidence related to psychometric properties of existing standardized assessments, including reliability, validity, and responsiveness will be critically analyzed and applied to decision making. Students will utilize evidence to support best practice selection, application, and interpretation of assessments for integration into clinical/community practice and research.

Semester Two

Students will apply the fundamentals of qualitative research to effectively design and implement qualitative research. Emphasis will be on data collection and coding strategies for analysis, insuring appropriate rigor and trustworthiness for a variety of qualitative methodologies including grounded theory, ethnography, and phenomology. Students will be given opportunities to apply course material to program evaluation and/or final doctoral project.
This course will introduce students to the principles of program evaluation and its applications. Students will design summative and formative evaluations of health and human services, collect and analyze data, determine strengths and weaknesses of various programs and services, document results, and make recommendations regarding program development and improvement.

Summer

This web-assisted course presents basic concepts of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in a format appropriate to both consumers of research literature and clinicians planning to initiate research projects and program evaluation. Methods of analysis and synthesis of data are covered in a conceptual, rather than a mathematical manner to enable clinicians to critique research as appropriate for implementing evidence-based practice. Prerequisite: HSCI 536-Evidence-Based Decision Making
Electives are available both within the DHSc Program and in the broader College and University.  Students should speak with the Academic Counselor and/or DHSc Program Director prior to registration.
This course presents models and theories of leadership within the context of complex health organizations and systems. Students will gain understanding of personal competencies, executive roles, managing interprofessional teams, ethics, and assessment in health professions leadership.

Year Three*

Semester One

Students identify and develop, through literature review and consultation with experts and instructor, an area of interest for further scholarly work in the doctoral project. Pre-requisite HSCI 537-Research Methods
This course is designed for students to build knowledge and skills in the cross-cutting public health competency of diversity and culture. Students will be guided through intensive self-analysis followed by examination of the concepts and indicators of cultural competence necessary for effective professional practice with diverse clients, communities, staff, colleagues, and organizations. Evidence and review of the literature on the role of culturally competent health professionals and health disparities will also be included.

Semester Two

This course is designed for students planning careers involving analysis and formulation of, and advocacy for policies that impact population health. Policies across multiple settings including organizational, corporate, local, state and global public policies will be analyzed within the context of various ethical frameworks. Emphasis is placed on comprehensive analyses resulting in recognition of policy as a major tool of public health and recommendations for action and advocacy to impact population health policies.
Electives are available both within the DHSc Program and in the broader College and University.  Students should speak with the Academic Counselor and/or DHSc Program Director prior to registration.
Students will work independently with assigned Chair of Doctoral Project Committee to develop components of proposal necessary for submitting to University of Indianapolis Institutional Review Board. This may include but is not limited to: completing CITI training; developing data collection instruments such as surveys or semi-structured interview guides; writing informed consent documents; and securing letters of agreement for research sites. Pre-requisite: HSCI 798-Doctoral Project Proposal Development

Summer

Students complete an original culminating project that integrates concepts from the clinical focus, cognate and inquiry areas studied within their degree plan. "Original work" is defined broadly to include a variety of scholarly activities, including but not limited to literature synthesis, clinical/case reports, program development and implementation, and data collection and analysis. Pre-requisite: HSCI 798-Doctoral Project Proposal Development

Year Four

Semester One

Students complete an original culminating project that integrates concepts from the clinical focus, cognate and inquiry areas studied within their degree plan. "Original work" is defined broadly to include a variety of scholarly activities, including but not limited to literature synthesis, clinical/case reports, program development and implementation, and data collection and analysis. Pre-requisite: HSCI 798-Doctoral Project Proposal Development
 
*Required on-campus session in August, the Friday and Saturday one week prior to the start of the fall semester.
These courses are available for enrollment by non-degree seeking and auditing students